Enjoying Life Every Day

Freedom is the ability to pursue living your life within the constraints of society, culture and the law, without depriving others of their opportunities to experience the same. 

brandnewdayEinstein’s words were, “Life is all about choices. How many people are trapped in their everyday habits: part numb, part frightened, part indifferent? To have a better life we must keep choosing how we’re living.”

Living each day as a brand new day is a choice to live a free life, a positively focused life, unencumbered with emotional baggage.

Being thankful can completely transform one’s disposition. The more we pause to consider the things we have to be grateful for, the more we begin to focus on those things. And the things we focus on, we tend to draw toward ourselves.

Peter G. James Sinclair of Dumb Little Man: Tips for Life blog shares 5 Sure-Fire Ways To Enjoy Every Day Of Your Life.

1. Stop taking yourself too seriously;

2. Learn to laugh;

3. Surround yourself with winners;

4. Express gratitude daily;

5. Pursue your passion with 111% enthusiasm.

Peter Clemens is founder of The Change Blog. The “Every Day Mindset” is a simple, yet extremely powerful, way in which to live your life. What is this mindset? Put simply, it is a mindset that remembers that this day you are currently living will only ever happen once, and it therefore encourages you to make the most of it.  — How to Enjoy Life Every Day,  24 Daily Habits and 12 More Daily Habits contain guidelines that I have adapted and committed to.

Today when I typed “enjoy the ride” into Google search I found this lovely little video.

18 thoughts on “Enjoying Life Every Day

  1. Pingback: Doing Less, Producing More, Feeling Great | this time - this space

  2. TT, I apologize for not visiting more often, but you’ve been in my thought, always.
    Well, I am still learning how to take myself less seriously.
    I hope your physical condition is improving as well as your mind. Sometime I could not separate them apart. I myself is make progress, and I hope this 2012 end-of-world fuss will also end my “dark middle age”.
    Take care and have a wonderful holiday!
    Yun Yi

    • Hello yunyi,
      It’s so good to hear from you. Thanks so much for the blog visit. 2012 was a year when 3 people important to me died. I hope 2013 will be a year when I form relationships with 3 people who are destined to become close friends.

      We are still busy at work though we had expected things to slow down. I’m busy baking and filling my Christmas cookie tins. http://thistimethisspace.com/2011/12/21/grandmas-christmas-goodies-tins/

      Happy holidays to you. Be well, happy and laugh a lot in 2013.

      • sorry to hear your loss, tt. it must be hard. hope next year will be brighter. next year is my year – snake! hope my health get some fundamental change.
        happy new year!

  3. It’s amazing to consider how unique each moment is and the way it will never be replicated ever again in precisely the same way. Thanks for this reminder to keep our attitude fresh.

  4. Hi TT,

    We should try to enjoy each day, because as we are so often reminded by the world around us, tomorrow is promised to no one. Our troubles are often temporary, so thinking positively, focusing on our blessings, and having a little faith can see us through.

    From the video, “Use the nice sheets today, don’t wait for a special occasion,” is a mindset that I incorporated into my being long ago, and I think that I have been better off for it.

    • Hi Ray,
      You’re right. While it’s true our troubles are often temporary they seem like they will never end and if we don’t keep our spirits up we can make matters much worse. We need to be our own cheerleaders when we go through bad times. Sadly we don’t all get the kind of education required to develop coping skills in our home or in schools so we can assume that internal role.

      Hope, courage and strength are the keys to perseverance. Hope isn’t wishful thinking, it’s the confident expectation of a change in direction. http://thistimethisspace.com/2011/07/12/hope-courage-and-strength/

      I don’t mean to offend when I say that I am not a religious person. I don’t consider “belief” and “faith” to be defined the way most people define them to be useful at all. My definitions are in line with Allan Watts. See here for a clear explanation http://thistimethisspace.com/2012/09/25/clinging-to-the-rock-or-swimming/

      “Belief clings, but faith let’s go…faith is the essential virtue of science, and likewise of any religion that is not self-deception.” To have faith is to trust yourself to experience what is.

      Aha! You twigged to the “Use the nice sheets today, don’t wait for a special occasion” admonition. I’m grateful that I changed my mindset on that years ago too.

      • Hi TT,

        No offense taken. It’s funny that I almost erased the phrase “have a little faith” after writing it because faith in a deity is not where I was going with that. Many people lead their lives with that kind of faith, which works for them, but I meant it in the “this too shall pass” sense of getting over a rough patch. Yes, the bad times may seem like they will never end, but our experience lets us know that they usually do.

  5. Great post. It inspires me to cherish every moment of my life. Which is why, I’m going to annoy my husband with kisses and hugs. LOL

  6. Lovely article! Gratitude feels terrific, as does focusing on what’s good in life. The cherry on top is self-compassion when you can’t quite get to that place of gratitude on a particular day.

    I have to disagree with Sinclair’s advice to “Stop taking yourself too seriously,” because what I see as a therapist is people not taking themselves seriously enough – trying to ignore or minimize hurts that need healing attention.

    Therefore I’d like to propose changing that one to “Take yourself very seriously; if you don’t, who will?”

    • Hi Tina,
      I like your take on the “stop taking yourself too seriously” admonition. There have been many occasions when I took the things that did not matter too seriously and minimized those that did matter. I blew little things up way out of all proportion by dramatizing them and created distraction after distraction. I also frequently intellectualized the small stuff as a way of escaping from dealing with what were serious issues. Once again I appreciate your point of view and thank you so much for your clarity.

    • Hi Jerry,
      The little video was both charming and rich with deeper meaning. I’m glad you appreciated it too. I hope you have a lovely and lively new day.

    • Hi Baxter,
      I’m happy that you like my post. Maintaining an appreciative attitude every day leads to sharing positive energy, which is contagious and that’s why it’s so precious.

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